Having just added new photos to my print gallery (more than a dozen bird species), I want to say my heart-felt thanks to each of you who has bought a print from me in the past.  My thanks to those of you who check out my gallery site and consider making a purchase.  Each purchase helps me to continue my field studies at Jordan Lake and I do enjoy the studying.  However, my biggest joy is in the sharing with all of you what I observe at the lake. Thanks for considering a purchase.
Peace and Grace, Doc Ellen
Special Pricing this week only:
Coupon Code:  Autumn658
Coupon Name: Autumn Sale
10% discount on all relevant items
Limit use 1 time
Dates: Tuesday Nov 19, 2019 – Saturday Nov 23, 2019
PS: Here is a sample from my newest collection Palette … and, yes, it is a photograph that the child-heart of me dreamed into a new vision…
(actual print does not have the watermark)

While on the Haw River above the main lake, a friend and I watched a pair of immature bald eagles practicing the maneuver known as a death spiral. I managed to get one of the talon to talon grabs that the youngsters were practicing; when they get really good at this skill they lock both feet to both feet. This is a critical skill for a bald eagle to learn as it is part of the breeding behavior of a potential breeding pair of bald eagles. The upper bird is a 4-year-old and the lower bird is a 3-year-old.

A female osprey and a number of fishermen were all fishing the riprap. Normally the ospreys see the active fishing lines and avoid them. This morning, perhaps because of the glinting sunshine, the osprey flew into a line. Immediately two of the fishermen rushed to her rescue. Quickly the Army Corps ranger arrived and joined in. It took just under 10 minutes for the 3 kind souls to free the osprey of all the line and release her, unhurt. Thanks to the fishermen and the ranger the osprey flew safely back to her nest and family.

 

 

From one end of Jordan Lake to the other, the ospreys are hauling in big bass.
Dad osprey was fishing in the Haw River, inside the riprap at the dam.
Into the flight path of the osprey a great blue heron appeared.
The osprey ignored the squawking heron and concentrated on the bass.
You can see that the raptor was struggling to get the whole fish above the water.
Dad osprey managed the lift and was up and away towards his nest. Whew!