Godiva, mother bald eagle at H&G nest, soared from the tree line and past me. Her mass easy to see…from the huge beak, through the vast bulk of her body and into feet and talons that show the grip that is said to be about 10 times stronger than the grip of a human hand! In other words those massive talons can exert up to about 400psi. Some grip!

 

Having just added new photos to my print gallery (more than a dozen bird species), I want to say my heart-felt thanks to each of you who has bought a print from me in the past.  My thanks to those of you who check out my gallery site and consider making a purchase.  Each purchase helps me to continue my field studies at Jordan Lake and I do enjoy the studying.  However, my biggest joy is in the sharing with all of you what I observe at the lake. Thanks for considering a purchase.
Peace and Grace, Doc Ellen
Special Pricing this week only:
Coupon Code:  Autumn658
Coupon Name: Autumn Sale
10% discount on all relevant items
Limit use 1 time
Dates: Tuesday Nov 19, 2019 – Saturday Nov 23, 2019
PS: Here is a sample from my newest collection Palette … and, yes, it is a photograph that the child-heart of me dreamed into a new vision…
(actual print does not have the watermark)

Godiva was speeding down the lake when she suddenly pulled up vertical.  Her mate Hershey was headed her way, also in a hurry.  Godiva decided to challenge Hershey, possibly to a death spiral, but he wasn’t in any mood for the high stakes aerial.  Hershey streaked over Godiva.  Godiva was so mad she about stalled out of the air in her turn around to chase her mate.  They both were quickly out of my sight.

Hershey and Godiva are one of the mated pairs of bald eagles at Jordan Lake. This morning, while Hurricane Dorian was still off SC and we were just starting to get some good gusts, Godiva called out to Hershey, challenging him to a chase in the strengthening wind. By the way, Hershey is the light brown eagle (he is named after the chocolate bar) and Godiva is the normal dark brown of a bald eagle.

H&G Nest
 
Mom Godiva had been lurking on a high perch when she jumped and streaked to just above water level.
Her direction was taking her straight down the shore line.
I heard a great blue heron give its grumpy annoyed don’t-you-dare-disturb-me yell.
Floating behind the heron was a dead fish.
I realized that the eagle’s flight path was straight for the heron.  Both birds wanted the fish.
I wondered if a collision was eminent.
But, no.  Godiva lifted up over the heron, glanced down at the fish and kept moving past.
I continued to track Godiva and when I looked back to the heron, it had flown almost out of sight, fish dangling from its beak.