Jordan Lake Bald Eagle Nest report: First Nest

This is the other chick in the nest. Like its sibling from yesterday, it is pouting … Mom Kate (in the second photo) came zooming in from the main lake and passed right by the nest to go and harass some ospreys. The chick is centered in the nest and it is looking to the right. You can see it has a lot of white feathers across its upper chest. I don’t know yet if this is what is known as a “white belly”. Kate and Petruchio have had other white belly chicks.

Jordan Lake Bald Eagle Nest report: First Nest

The chick is very, very interested in the food that dad Petruchio is studying and thinking about feeding to the chick

Much to the annoyance of the chick, Dad takes notice of something … other than the food the chick wants and is pointedly showing Dad where his attention should be.

Dad explains to the chick that watching for possible dangers comes first, yes, even before food.

The chick takes to pouting and Dad goes back to observing.

Jordan Lake: I was driving slowly near an embankment when I heard an osprey screaming. I threw the truck in park and jumped out trying to get my iPhone set to do a video. An adult bald eagle flashed through the trees. Because of the osprey scream, I thought the eagle was probably chasing the other raptor. But, no, the bald eagle was chasing double-crested cormorants. I don’t know if the eagle was after breakfast – they will take cormorants – or as eagles are prone to do, it was harassing the other birds. Not quite a full minute, but, oh boy, is the video full of action.

Jordan Lake: to quote Mike Lemery from his marvelous documentary Pursuit – Eagles of Conowingo Dam, “sometimes you wonder what goes through the mind of an eagle”. I wonder just what this bald eagle was seeing and thinking as she ignored me and Captain Doug as though we had been noted, accepted and then dismissed for we were not food nor enemy. We were but a fleeting moment in the mind of this eagle.

Jordan Lake Dam, Haw River: I promptly told this very handsome male osprey that I most definitely would not challenge him for his fish! I am, however, asking for you to be on the lookout for him. Did you notice that his back and upper side of his flight feathers appear to be black and not a deep brown? I have seen this osprey twice and since the first time was right after sunrise, I assumed the “black” was due to shadows. But, yesterday, when I took this photo, it was 9:51AM and so less likely for shadows to be causing the interesting color of his back and upper wings. If you see him, could you let me know? Thanks!