Help Protect the Bald Eagles at Jordan Lake!  We all want to see the bald eagles and perhaps get a photograph.  Here is how to see the eagles and not bother them. This time of the year it is breeding season for our bald eagles.   It is up to us to protect the parents and their families.  The MOST important rule is this: stay at least 660 feet from a nest – that is the length of 2 football fields.  If there are ANY signs of agitation by the parents, even if you are far away, please simply leave the area.  Do you know that bald eagles are very sensitive to human intrusion and will get so upset that they will abandon their nest and its eggs or chicks!  Yes, the parents will do this.  So, if you find yourself near a nest, please leave and let the parents have the peace and quiet they need in order to take care of their families.  If the eagle isn’t near a nest, then you can approach within 330ft – that is 1 football field away.   We would also ask that if you see a disturbance at a bald eagle nest, please call the Jordan Lake State Recreation Area office at (919) 362-0586.  Help us keep these distance rules and you are helping the bald eagles take care of their families and giving us generations of sightings!

Jordan Lake: Time is of the essence when it is cold and the parent eagles need to trade places on the eggs.  Eggs left uncovered in the cold winter air will die if left uncovered for more than 2 minutes.  Mom Kate was on the egg(s) when I arrived. 2 hours later she started calling and Dad Petruchio arrived.  Kate jumped up on the branch next to Petruchio (she is closest to the trunk). They glanced down at their eggs.  Dad Petruchio jumped down into the nest and settled onto the eggs and Mom Kate left for some flight time.  The whole exchange took 38 seconds.  This is a critical time for the eggs and then for chicks up to 2 weeks of age because any disturbance by humans can cause the parents to leave the eggs or chicks exposed too long and the disturbance could quickly become fatal to the new family. 

Jordan Lake: Good News for the New Year! First Nest has egg(s). Yes! The eggs were laid at some point after December 26.

1) Mom Kate flew over me, heading out to the lake after she and Dad Petruchio had switched places on the eggs – yep, both the female and male bald eagle help with the incubation.

2) Dad Petruchio landing just above the nest to make sure Momma Kate is ok (you can’t see her).

3) Mom Kate in the nest – her head is just above the brim and she is looking out the right side of the nest.  Look for her yellow beak.

4) Both parents at the nest.  Mom Kate is standing up in the nest and her head is to the right – she is rolling eggs.  Dad Petruchio is above the nest, on the left of the main trunk, look for his white head. I apologize for the photos at the nest, but, the weather did not want to co-operate; fog everywhere.

Jordan Lake: First Nest update. Bald eagles mate for life. Every breeding cycle they renew their commitment to each other by sky dancing and food offerings. Petruchio brings his mate Kate a bird as his commitment offering as they get very near to mating.

Jordan Lake: Bald Eagle Nest Report: H&G NestI watched Dad Hershey go past with a large, rather branched repair stick for his nest. Not more than 200 feet behind him came Mom Godiva. More often than not it is the dad bald eagle that carries the branches and mom who does the reconstruction work. But, I have seen moms carrying sticks and dads hard at work patching the nest. Good to see the work going forward for the breeding season.