I admit: I had gotten more than a little frustrated with the rain and more rain.
Then Mother Nature handed me a breath-taking gift.
On top of the dam this morning my friend sang out “look at that”.
Though a fine veil of rain, a rainbow appeared over the peninsula between the Haw River and the New Hope River.
Oh my.

Jordan Lake Dam Neighborhood and How to Tell it is Cold without using a Thermometer!
 
Anytime a bird, like this eastern bluebird, is as round as it is tall, it is cold.
Fluffing one’s feathers traps air and warms the bird.
Having found a patch of sunlight and using the trunk of the pine tree as a block to the wind, this tufted titmouse is warm.
A well-rounded and therefore warmer, pine warbler is looking for another tasty pine seed for its breakfast.
The eastern phoebe is a flycatcher,
but in the cold weather will feed on small berries and any insect or spider lured out in the open by a patch of warm sunshine.
This great blue heron, while stalking a rival, has done just what the smaller birds do, and become well-rounded and fluffed against the cold.

The late morning glare was bright on and above the Haw River and the light was frustrating me and my camera.
Then movement coalesced out of the glare and two bald eagles appeared.
A mature bald eagle was chasing the other eagle, a 4-year-old.
Between the glare and fast action, I didn’t realize the 4-year-old eagle was carrying a fish until I glanced down at my camera’s screen.
The adult bald eagle had been chasing the younger bird, hoping to steal its meal.

This morning at the dam it was officially COLD!
 
Bald eagles love bright, cold, brisk, and windy weather.
 
The sunrise brought the first eagle of the day.
 
Not long after the first adult, another adult came by, ignored me and looked back and to the south.
I grabbed a moment, quit shooting and looked too, but could not see what the eagle was watching.
 
Several juveniles came through during the morning.
This one is a two-year-old bald eagle.
The last juvenile of my morning was this 3-year-old bald eagle watching for fish in the Haw River right at the dam.