Well, grump, I have not been able to get to Jordan Lake since Saturday – even my truck with its 4-wheel drive is not up to navigating ice. 
So, I thought I would gather some of my photos of the week prior to the storm and try to bring some lake good thoughts to all of us!!!
Here is an edition of my doc ellen’s Jordan Lake Neighborhood where I share some of the smaller, but as adored, birds with all of you.
I  surely hope to be reporting on eagles from the lake tomorrow!
This pine warbler leaped toward me from the pinecone below him where he had been tearing pine nuts from the cone for a meal.
 Eastern phoebes are slim flycatchers, but the cold wind had made this one fluff his feathers up into a warm layer.
 I grew up calling this bird a rufous-sided towhee – very appropriate for his plumage.
But, a few years back his name was changed to eastern towhee and this bird and the spotted towhee became a single species.
Quite a glint of sun on a cold morning in the eye of this white-throated sparrow.
This eastern bluebird seems to be guarding the locked cap that secures one of the test vents for the dam.
There is another great blue heron across the river (unseen in the photo).
Herons are ever on the outlook for any intruders of their own species.

Jordan Lake Dam Neighborhood and How to Tell it is Cold without using a Thermometer!
 
Anytime a bird, like this eastern bluebird, is as round as it is tall, it is cold.
Fluffing one’s feathers traps air and warms the bird.
Having found a patch of sunlight and using the trunk of the pine tree as a block to the wind, this tufted titmouse is warm.
A well-rounded and therefore warmer, pine warbler is looking for another tasty pine seed for its breakfast.
The eastern phoebe is a flycatcher,
but in the cold weather will feed on small berries and any insect or spider lured out in the open by a patch of warm sunshine.
This great blue heron, while stalking a rival, has done just what the smaller birds do, and become well-rounded and fluffed against the cold.

My friend and I had spent the morning at Jordan Lake watching eagles, gulls, crows and killdeer.
We were all packed up and getting ready to head out when my friend noticed a tiny bird being busy in the grass.
Nothing to do but I took out my iPhone and started to quietly walk in on the pine warbler.
The little bird tolerated us and so I slowly, gently walked forward.
There followed several minutes of joy on my part and a studied indifference on the bird’s part.
I hope you enjoy the short video.

_RK_4116 pine warbler 2014

Cocking his head at me and stopping his food hunt for a moment, the Pine Warbler said: you seem to be as quizzical as I feel.