Bald Eagle Death Spiral
As they mature at the age of 5, Bald Eagles use the Death Spiral to determine the fitness of a potential mate.
The sky challenge is there to prove to each eagle that the other one is just as arrogant, assured, and fit as the other.
The eagles clasp each other’s talons and dare the other one to let go first.
The difference in the size of the smaller male to the larger female causes the birds to spiral around their axis.
Sometimes, the drive to win is so strong that the hold is not broken and the birds crash into the ground or the water.
Immature eagles practice this maneuver all the time.  In this case it is a pair of four-year-old bald eagles.
Death can occur.  These two immature eagles broke the clasp just as they got to the tree line.

Jordan Lake Neighborhood
 
Great blue herons often argue and chase one another.
Each is certain that the other heron has the better fishing spot on the bank.
This fracas started on the shore of the Haw River, inside the riprap.
The dam was stunning fish as they passed through the gates and the pickings were easy.
Unless, of course, your neighbor heron was further upstream than you were and the fish passed them first.
Both herons missed the fish and a third heron a little further downstream had it for breakfast.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Winter Gathering Lecture 02/16/2019
 
In spite of the winter grey skies, the dripping clouds and eventually a cold wind, we had a wonderful time.
There were many great questions and discussions about the bald eagles in their Jordan Lake Paradise.
At the end of the indoor session, we bundled up and went out to the ramp behind the Visitor Center.
Look what was waiting for us!
 We watched the eagle. Then the eagle watched us.  What fun on a winter day.
Next lecture will be in March – watch my FB site or the Jordan Lake State Recreation Area web site for date and subject.

First Nest
 
OH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This morning I saw the FIRST CHICK.
That is Dad Petruchio landing with a fish.
The chick is sitting in front of Mom Kate.
The chick is a spiky white fuzz ball with a shiny black beak, looking slightly to the right.
I have enclosed 2 copies of the same photo because it can be hard to see chicks at this stage.
The red arrow in the second photo is pointing at the chick.