Captain Doug and I went cruising the lake in his boat, looking for the fledglings and parents.
All the nests have now fledged their chicks and so its hard to find the families.
The two fledglings at the H&G Nest of Godiva and Hershey.
One fledgling is just to the left of the nest, at nest brim height.
The other fledgling is way to the left in the photo and near the top – it is small so look carefully.
At First Nest we could see the nest was in good shape, but didn’t see the fledglings.
We rounded the corner to find Mom Kate looking at something way up high and ignoring us.
At Captain’s Nest we hit the jackpot and found the family at home.
This photo has both fledglings in it.
One up high over the nest and the other fledgling you can just see the roundness of the top of its head at the nest brim.
Captain Nest Dad coming in for a landing.
Captain Nest Mom, being imperious and a joy to see.

We started this month on Monday with an eagle – which was grand because we hadn’t had one in a long time. This morning, at 06:14 AM, Lady Lake appeared out of the rising sun and soared past me. My oh my. Two neat bald eagles for me to share with you in one week! I haven’t seen Lady Lake of the LL&H nest since the beginning of the year.

A note about Keeping ALL of Us Safely Together:  Please check back on Monday … I am working on a Keeping-In-Touch plan if the coronavirus keeps us from the lake …
H&G Nest has TWO chicks.
Kinda hard to see, but the two dark lumps at the brim of the nest and between Mom Godiva and the trunk are chicks.
Dad Petruchio at First Nest seems to be as confused about the way the world is atilt as we are.
One of the chicks at First Nest … BIG isn’t it
Both of the chicks at First Nest
From left to right is one of the chicks and then Dad Petruchio;
see what looks like a piece of typing paper above Dad and where the chick is staring… that is Mom Kate’s tail.

 

This nest is the longest reach for my camera. The first photo is Mom Godiva on lookout. The second photo is Dad Hershey in the nest. He is just to the left of the trunk of the tree; look for his yellow beak just above the nest brim. Bald eagles share incubation and brooding duties. Mom does somewhat more of the incubation duties than dad and she is the one that usually incubates during the night.