Time for a Ramble in the Jordan Lake Neighborhood
 
The Cooper’s hawk is small, swift and often takes medium-sized birds while in flight.
 
 
 
Cedar waxwings are winter visitors here.
They love cedar berries and you can see the red “wax” at the inside lower edge of this one’s wing.
 
 
 
 
 
The first time I saw a Bonaparte gull I thought it was some species of tern.
These are dancers just above the water as they hunt for fish.
 
 
 
 
Immature great blue herons often look like they are feathered in a wash made from grey and pink pearls.
 
 

Doing a little catching up with some birds from the last couple of days.
 
I have put the great blue heron first because I think he is asking just why is his lake full of trash.
He can understand in his way the tree trunks and limbs and vines but the trash just bewilders him.
If you zoom in you can all kinds of human debris in the water.  This is at the foot of the Jordan Lake Dam Tower.
 
 
The beautiful adult female bald eagle is searching among the debris for a fish to capture.
 
The 3-year-old eagle has caught a fish in amongst all the debris and trash.
I was startled that I caught so much of the reflection, at the distance I was shooting.
 
 
 
Oh, my a chimney swift!  There were about a dozen of the birds out chasing flying insects.
A life list first for me today.

Jordan Lake post flooding:
You are correct: this is not the normal hues of the river water.
I was tweaking the photo to bring out the colors of the great blue heron when I realized that with a tad bit more of “blue” I could show you much better the anger of the waves of the Haw River as it escapes the dam’s tailrace. The tweak also allows you to see the water starting to lap once again over the fishing pier which is where the heron has landed.
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

As of this evening, the lake level is down to 232.15, hooray!
Still a long way to go to normal pool level of 216 feet.  All access to the lake except at the dam is still closed.
 
Sunrise in the lifting fog at the dam.
 
 
The foggy landscape cleared just enough for me to take this long shot of an adult eagle heading south over the lake.
 
 
Not long after the adult eagle flew past, a 2-year-old eagle caught my attention as it was heading northward up the lake.
 
 
Looking puzzled, the great blue heron lets us see how turbulent the Haw River has become as it escapes at the higher flow rate the Army Corps of Engineers gave it.
 
 
As I was packing up for the day, I was given a moment of laughter:  this crow zipped past, beak filled with 2 acorns.
 
 

Jordan Lake Dam this morning, post Hurricane Florence and in the midst of many rivers flooding. Where I could, I provided photos of before and after the storm and the ongoing river flooding. The dam is doing EXACTLY what it was built for: flood control. Without the Jordan Lake dam and reservoir, the flooding downstream would have been even more devastating. My thanks to the Army Corps of Engineers for helping to keep us safe and mitigating the wrath of the hurricane.

 

Ranger Cove, Jordan Lake Neighborhood
 
The glitter of a ruby-throated hummingbird against the soft glow my lens made of the background foliage.
A quizzical northern cardinal made me smile.
 
Bright eyes, startling gold against the iridescent deep purple-black of a common grackle.
The snowy egret’s translucence allows you to see the bones and joints of its wing: of its shoulder, elbow, wrist and fingers.
Note too that his feet have yellow socks!
 
Perched probably 60 feet up at the top of a tree, it is a little startling to see an immature great blue heron surveying the cove.
Actually great blue herons of all ages often spend a great deal of time way up in tall trees.