Jordan Lake Dam: June Flight Jamboree!!
Sunday morning was cool and bright. All the feathers in flight glittered with life.
Parent birds. Juveniles. Big birds and small ones.

 

1) Northern Cardinal, male juvenile
2) Blue Grosbeak
3) Common Grackle
4) Brown-headed Cowbird
5) Fish Crow
6) Great Crested Flycatchers, juveniles
7) Eastern Bluebird
8) Osprey
9) Summer Tanager

Well, grump, I have not been able to get to Jordan Lake since Saturday – even my truck with its 4-wheel drive is not up to navigating ice. 
So, I thought I would gather some of my photos of the week prior to the storm and try to bring some lake good thoughts to all of us!!!
Here is an edition of my doc ellen’s Jordan Lake Neighborhood where I share some of the smaller, but as adored, birds with all of you.
I  surely hope to be reporting on eagles from the lake tomorrow!
This pine warbler leaped toward me from the pinecone below him where he had been tearing pine nuts from the cone for a meal.
 Eastern phoebes are slim flycatchers, but the cold wind had made this one fluff his feathers up into a warm layer.
 I grew up calling this bird a rufous-sided towhee – very appropriate for his plumage.
But, a few years back his name was changed to eastern towhee and this bird and the spotted towhee became a single species.
Quite a glint of sun on a cold morning in the eye of this white-throated sparrow.
This eastern bluebird seems to be guarding the locked cap that secures one of the test vents for the dam.
There is another great blue heron across the river (unseen in the photo).
Herons are ever on the outlook for any intruders of their own species.

Jordan Lake Dam Neighborhood and How to Tell it is Cold without using a Thermometer!
 
Anytime a bird, like this eastern bluebird, is as round as it is tall, it is cold.
Fluffing one’s feathers traps air and warms the bird.
Having found a patch of sunlight and using the trunk of the pine tree as a block to the wind, this tufted titmouse is warm.
A well-rounded and therefore warmer, pine warbler is looking for another tasty pine seed for its breakfast.
The eastern phoebe is a flycatcher,
but in the cold weather will feed on small berries and any insect or spider lured out in the open by a patch of warm sunshine.
This great blue heron, while stalking a rival, has done just what the smaller birds do, and become well-rounded and fluffed against the cold.

Its time to see what other birds, um, non-bald eagles are in the neighborhood.
 
Accipiters are fast hawks that chase other birds.
This is an immature Cooper’s hawk.
 
 
Just how many fish does this crow have in its beak?
 
 
Sometimes going away gives a spectacular view – this is a ring-billed gull.
 
 
The waters of the lake make a beautiful backdrop for this male eastern bluebird.
 
 
The American pipit is a winter visitor and a new bird for my Life List.
 
 
I almost always hear a killdeer before I see it and I better be looking quick for they zip past in a hurry.
 

The ospreys have returned from South America – welcome home.

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One year old bald eagle looking fierce in the morning light.

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A very cold eastern bluebird, who like me, was wondering where the warm weather went.

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Great blue heron stalking through the shoreline bushes.

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Belted kingfisher surveying the waters for his next fish.

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The small pied-billed grebe is named after the way the black ring bisects his beak.

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The morning light illuminates this Bonaparte’s gull.

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