Jordan Lake. This butterfly has an interesting name, “question mark”. I have photographed dozens of these butterflies. This is the first time I’ve gotten a very clear and distinct photo of the marking that gives the butterfly its name. On the underside of the hind wing you can clearly see a white “question mark“. It is always fun when I get to share photographic evidence for an insect’s name.

question mark butterfly
note the “question mark” on the hind wing

Are butterflies close to your heart? Do you enjoy the wildflowers of Jordan Lake? Do you know which critters pollinate the wildflowers and trees of Jordan Lake? Join Doc Ellen as she explores the interactions of the flora of Jordan Lake and some of the pollinators involved.Please register for Pollinators: Jordan Lake Wildflowers, Butterflies, Birds and Bees! on Aug 24, 2021 7:00 PM EDT at:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7300334313178877709
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
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Jordan Lake Dam, Haw River: Usually, when I sit down to edit my day’s photo shoot, I go chronologically. But this afternoon, I began at the end of the shoot so I could bring you my first eastern tiger swallowtail of this year. Please enjoy the sunny bright colors of the butterfly sipping nectar from the blooming redbud tree. Now, where was I … oh yes … on to the ospreys from this morning.

Jordan Dam Critters
 
The monarch butterflies are migrating and this morning at the dam I had more than a dozen flit past me, all heading south.
 
 
The veins are so well defined on the wings of this common buckeye butterfly.
 
 
And, so, when is a butterfly, not a butterfly?
For the answer: study these next two photos…
 
 
When the flying insect is a grasshopper.  How about the elegance in those wings!!

I realized this evening that I have been concentrating on water, water, flooding water everywhere.
So, let’s catch up with some of the other events in the Jordan Lake Dam Neighborhood.
 
While trying to catch the fog lifting above the long leaf pine meadow, a flock of double-crested cormorants graced the rising sun.
 
 
A fledgling bald eagle, one of this year’s babies, seemed to challenge the sun and flew into the east.
 
 
Here is an adult bald eagle, very intent on something way across the main lake, near where the Haw River joins the Middle Creek.
 
 
If her stout beak had not protruded way past the clump of leaves where she perched, I would have missed the female belted kingfisher.
 
 
And then there are the small winged creatures, like this common buckeye butterfly, that try to sense if I am to be avoided or dismissed.