A female osprey and a number of fishermen were all fishing the riprap. Normally the ospreys see the active fishing lines and avoid them. This morning, perhaps because of the glinting sunshine, the osprey flew into a line. Immediately two of the fishermen rushed to her rescue. Quickly the Army Corps ranger arrived and joined in. It took just under 10 minutes for the 3 kind souls to free the osprey of all the line and release her, unhurt. Thanks to the fishermen and the ranger the osprey flew safely back to her nest and family.

 

 

From one end of Jordan Lake to the other, the ospreys are hauling in big bass.
Dad osprey was fishing in the Haw River, inside the riprap at the dam.
Into the flight path of the osprey a great blue heron appeared.
The osprey ignored the squawking heron and concentrated on the bass.
You can see that the raptor was struggling to get the whole fish above the water.
Dad osprey managed the lift and was up and away towards his nest. Whew!

The first half of the slideshow is about one of the H&G Nest bald eagle fledglings making a successful fishing strike.
The 2nd half shows the 2 year-old bald eagle who decided to visit Doc this morning.  She was about 50 feet from me.
This is the 2 year-old in the video posted earlier today.
My little iPhone tries hard when making videos, but it can’t bring to you the stills that my Canon camera does.

Bald Eagle Visitor
The crows harrassed this 2-year-old bald eagle into flying into the tree about 50 feet from and above me.
The youngster looked down at me, once, and apparently decided the crows deserved more of his attention!
We shared the space for several minutes:
me canted over the back of my chair trying hard to be steady with my iPhone as I looked up and recorded the eagle.
My what an unexpected visitor!