Having just added new photos to my print gallery (more than a dozen bird species), I want to say my heart-felt thanks to each of you who has bought a print from me in the past.  My thanks to those of you who check out my gallery site and consider making a purchase.  Each purchase helps me to continue my field studies at Jordan Lake and I do enjoy the studying.  However, my biggest joy is in the sharing with all of you what I observe at the lake. Thanks for considering a purchase.
Peace and Grace, Doc Ellen
Special Pricing this week only:
Coupon Code:  Autumn658
Coupon Name: Autumn Sale
10% discount on all relevant items
Limit use 1 time
Dates: Tuesday Nov 19, 2019 – Saturday Nov 23, 2019
PS: Here is a sample from my newest collection Palette … and, yes, it is a photograph that the child-heart of me dreamed into a new vision…
(actual print does not have the watermark)

The young hawk takes the opportunity to chase an American crow. The hawk is pestering the crow. The crow is much bigger than the hawk’s normal prey of sparrows and warblers. American crows raid hawk nests and steal eggs and chicks. Even though this is a juvenile hawk, he understands the damage a crow can do and decides to remind the crow just how agile a flier is the Sharp-shinned Hawk.

 

Laugh with Doc Ellen…
Uh, oh. As I watched a hawk zip over my head this morning, I found myself thinking it sure looked liked a “T” in flight and that could make it an Accipiter (Cooper’s hawk or sharp-shinned hawk). But then I glanced at the wings as it zipped past and went to attack a crow that was perched in a tree, and said no, leading wing edge said it had to be a red-shouldered hawk. Then my brain said wait a minute, red-shouldered hawks don’t usually go after something like a crow. And I dismissed all those thoughts because two juvenile eagles went across the sky chasing each other. Then I got home and started looking at this morning’s photos. I should always go with my first thought. It was an Accipiter. Drat that I didn’t notice that LONG tail and its band configuration. The hawk is a sharp-shinned hawk.

Hawks at Jordan Dam Today; Whew, 3 species!!!!!
I had spent all winter trying to get a photo of the first hawk in this group of Buteo hawks.
Buteo hawks are all called broad-winged hawks which is confusing because in the group there is a Broad-Winged Hawk!
This morning a medium-sized hawk appeared from the hill above the dam: it was my elusive Broad-winged hawk.
Broad-winged Hawk
Often confused with the red-shouldered hawk and even though it is fairly common,
is dismissed as a red-shouldered hawk and we don’t look twice.
Note the broad white tail stripe and the distinct black band that edges the trailing edge of the wing from wing-tips to body.
Red-shouldered Hawk
Looks very similar doesn’t it! But this hawk doesn’t have the broad black band lining the trailing edge of the wing.
BTW this is a juvenile; the other 2 hawks in this group are adults and that can add to the identification problems.
Red-tailed Hawk
All 3 birds are similar, in part because of the body shape and broad-wings.
Look back at the wings of all three hawks.
Note just how much distance there is from leading edge to trailing edge of the wing: BROAD WINGS indeed!

The golden hour gilds not only bald eagles, but red-shouldered hawks too.
 
This juvenile was very intent on something across the swampy part of the cove.
 
 
His interest pegged up a notch and he tapped his foot in anticipation.
 
 
His kee-ah, kee-ah call announced his growing impatience and readiness to hunt.
 
 
He glanced intently at me, making very certain I was watching – all youngsters want attention!
 
 
Then he launched and I wished him luck on his hunt.