Jordan Lake Dam: June Flight Jamboree!!
Sunday morning was cool and bright. All the feathers in flight glittered with life.
Parent birds. Juveniles. Big birds and small ones.

 

1) Northern Cardinal, male juvenile
2) Blue Grosbeak
3) Common Grackle
4) Brown-headed Cowbird
5) Fish Crow
6) Great Crested Flycatchers, juveniles
7) Eastern Bluebird
8) Osprey
9) Summer Tanager

Well, Dad Hershey had made this landing look easy and so his fledgling gave it a try.
But sticking a landing on a small round jagged top of a snapped-off tree trunk is an exercise that takes a lot of practice.
Just where do you place your feet when there is no limb which you can wrap your talons around?
This fledgling finally got both feet on the snag and was very proud of himself.

H&G Nest
 
Mom Godiva had been lurking on a high perch when she jumped and streaked to just above water level.
Her direction was taking her straight down the shore line.
I heard a great blue heron give its grumpy annoyed don’t-you-dare-disturb-me yell.
Floating behind the heron was a dead fish.
I realized that the eagle’s flight path was straight for the heron.  Both birds wanted the fish.
I wondered if a collision was eminent.
But, no.  Godiva lifted up over the heron, glanced down at the fish and kept moving past.
I continued to track Godiva and when I looked back to the heron, it had flown almost out of sight, fish dangling from its beak.

H&G Nest
 
I found Godiva sitting to the far left.  One chick on the rim of the nest.  One chick to the far right on a branch.
Mom Godiva flew out and I tracked her only to realize that one of the chicks had flown too!!!
I don’t know if the chick had fledged yesterday or today, but I am happy for the new flier.
The fledgling flew, circled, got tired and even though about 500 feet from the nest, dropped his feet for landing.
All fledglings make controlled crashes for landings.  This fledgling almost forgot to put on the brakes!
He was still going full speed when he disappeared from sight behind the main trunk.

Hawks at Jordan Dam Today; Whew, 3 species!!!!!
I had spent all winter trying to get a photo of the first hawk in this group of Buteo hawks.
Buteo hawks are all called broad-winged hawks which is confusing because in the group there is a Broad-Winged Hawk!
This morning a medium-sized hawk appeared from the hill above the dam: it was my elusive Broad-winged hawk.
Broad-winged Hawk
Often confused with the red-shouldered hawk and even though it is fairly common,
is dismissed as a red-shouldered hawk and we don’t look twice.
Note the broad white tail stripe and the distinct black band that edges the trailing edge of the wing from wing-tips to body.
Red-shouldered Hawk
Looks very similar doesn’t it! But this hawk doesn’t have the broad black band lining the trailing edge of the wing.
BTW this is a juvenile; the other 2 hawks in this group are adults and that can add to the identification problems.
Red-tailed Hawk
All 3 birds are similar, in part because of the body shape and broad-wings.
Look back at the wings of all three hawks.
Note just how much distance there is from leading edge to trailing edge of the wing: BROAD WINGS indeed!